I’m in the Patreon club

I’ve struggled for years – years – to make a good premium content method. It’s been clumsy and my supporters have been very patient with me. Now the product has caught up with the need, and Patreon is here.

So I’m putting a halt to new supporters of my Fabulist group and am giving out new perks to Patreon supporters.* I hope you check it out, I think it’s a great way to support someone’s creative work a little bit at a time.

Become a Patron

* Existing Fabulists, I’ve posted about this in our private community, check it out there if you have questions.

ISBW #318 – Read the fine print // Max Gladstone Interview

I was delighted to interview 2013 Campbell nominee, Max Gladstone, and I only held onto the interview for like 3 months. And then realized we got cut off at the end. BUT IT IS A GOOD INTERVIEW DANGIT.

I also give my opinions of reading the fine print, told in the perspective of the Amtrak Writer’s Residency idea.

Ghost Train to New Orleans- out now!

So I discovered that one of the worst things to happen during a book launch week is a 3 day migraine. which is why you haven’t heard much from me. But! The book is out, and the launch event is tonight is Chapel Hill, and coverage so far about the book has been good. So! Linkage!

  • Ghost Train to New Orleans is available now in many places! Ebook, paperback, and audio.
  • The book launch event details are here: Flyleaf books.
  • USA Today talked to me about podcasting.
  • And my university’s paper, the Daily Tar Heel, also did a story!

ISBW #317 – Feedback

In this show we cover what to do at each milestone of rejections. There is no maximum number of rejections you can get before you should stop writing. But you should mark the milestones regardless:

  • 100 rejections: Go to Google and search for your favorite author and see if you can find how many rejections THEY got before they had a sale. This will also test your Google skills, as the search may be difficult. Learn about JK Rowling’s homelessness, etc.
  • 200 rejections: Send a favorite author an email. Ask for an atta-girl/boy. Or if that scares you, tweet @MykeCole (who may also be your favorite author!) and say you need encouragement. He will deliver. Or heck, tweet at me – @mightymur.
  • 300 rejections: Join a writer’s group. If you can’t find one, create one at your local library.
  • 400 rejections: Go to your vineyard’s* website and order a cheap bottle of wine to feel sorry for yourself, and order the most expensive bottle you can because you are a damn working writer and deserve to be rewarded for it.
  • 500 rejections: start a betting pool to see how many rejections you will gather before you get a sale. [may be illegal in your state]
  • 600 rejections: Start your own podcast.

* I know wine isn’t everyone’s thing. Consider chocolate, or potato chips, or coffee. Whatever decadence you enjoy.




Out March 4!

(Amazon affiliate link)

Ghost Train to New Orleans – T-minus 5 days

Reminder of Ghost Train to New Orleans* events!

  • Tuesday, March 4: Ghost Train to New Orleans is out in book stores and ebook stores everywhere!**
  • Thursday, March 6, 7pm: Launch event at Flyleaf books in Chapel Hill, NC.

And watch this space for info on at least one event in April, convention updates, and more!

(Remember you can preorder anytime! And soon you can order signed copies of both Shambling Guide and Ghost Train from Chapel Hill Comics!)

*Word is that Waterstones is shelving it under horror. It’s urban fantasy/humor. Not terribly scary.
**Apparently it’s already hit some stores in the UK, but I haven’t seen/heard about it in the US

ISBW #316 – Confidence // Madeline Ashby Interview

[If you're here from USAToday.com, welcome!]

This episode we discuss how I’ve been writing out of order, and how lack of confidence creates a bit of a roadblock. Then we talk to Madeline Ashby, the awesome SF writer. Check out her books vN and iD.


Captain Spaulding tasting begins this week with Scott Sigler!

pandemic-cover-190x285The very first Captain Spaulding recipe test has been recorded by the awesome Scott Sigler (author of new SF/Horror/thriller, PANDEMIC). He was kind enough to post his thought on his blog, along with a picture and audio. So I’m stealing both. HAHAHA SCOTT.

Ahem. Scott’s Captain Spaulding will not be tested by the Official Testing Group, but it appears Scott has already tasted it, and found it delicious.

Audio for Scott’s recipe. 

Sigler's Captain Spaulding

 

* Don’t remember what the Captain Spaulding is all about? Read here.


Ghost Train to New Orleans – Out March 4

Boskone and professionalism

Yesterday afternoon I got home from Boskone. Had a stressful travel day, landed, and ran off to see Book of Mormon in Durham. It was awesome; I’ve been waiting nearly two years to see this show and it delivered.

Boskone was definitely worth the trip, despite the blizzard and the shortened con because I had to run home for the show. I got some good time with other authors, some editors, Stonecoast friends and mentors, and met some new fans. Panels were great, but one moment stood out: I had a “funny pose” panel (a-la Jim C. Hines) – which was amazingly fun – at 7pm on Saturday. At 730, Boskone held a big book launch party, and Orbit (my publisher) kindly sent in a box of Ghost Train to New Orleans. I was delighted and promised I’d get to the party right after the posing panel to push the books and sign them if people wanted me to. When I got there at 8pm they told me the very good and very bad news that my book had been one of the fastest moving titles (YAY) and thus they were all gone so there was nothing for me to sign, no fans to meet (BOO). Some people did find me later and have me sign their copy. (YAY)

But one thing came out of the con that has me thinking: I want to talk professionalism: When we talk about being a pro, it often means doing work even when we don’t want to, and being polite to others in your field so you’re not mocked as being a sexist asshat, but another aspect of being a pro hit me this weekend: no matter what level in your career that you are in, you go to cons to connect with people. Readers, writers, editors, agents, fans, dealers, what have you. Even if you’re a veteran there just to see old friends, the mere act of being in public reminds readers who you are, the panels increase your visibility, the signings and readings reconnect you with the fans and tell them I’m still writing.

But for the non veterans, for the new writers, or baby published writers like me, it can be hard. When I’ve talked about this in the past, I’ve always talked about approaching writers/editors/agents as getting over a shyness problem. But yesterday I realized it goes deeper than that. It’s our JOB to do this. Networking is part of the job, just like putting your butt in the chair is. And if you can’t do that part of your job, you might suffer.

Charlaine Harris was at the con. During a panel, my friend Kristabelle asked Harris a craft question and Harris jumped on it, delighted to talk about writing. Apparently not a lot of people ask her craft questions. “Well heck, maybe she’d like to be on ISBW,” I thought, and immediately got scared. Ask Charlaine Harris? That’s terrifying. She’s famous and important. I have little to no connection with her, I didn’t know anyone who could introduce us. I would have to essentially cold call (cold approach?) her in the middle of the con for an interview. Saturday night, I saw her having a drink with her agent at the bar, and thought, “when I finish this glass of wine I’ll be relaxed enough to ask her. And they might be done by then so I won’t have that “I’m interrupting” problem.” I forgot I was drinking on an empty stomach, and by the time the wine was gone, I was not in a professional space to approach an author I’ve never spoken to, and the next time I looked, she was gone anyway.

I could easily blame a number of things- the wine hit too hard, I should have eaten dinner, I didn’t want to interrupt her chat with her agent, blah blah. But the truth was, I was too scared to do my fucking job. And that can’t continue.

It’s not about being brave, it’s about doing the job. And I think (hope) if I approach networking and interviewing and the like with the mindset of “time make the donuts” then I might do this a little better.

(I’m sorry I didn’t score a Charlaine Harris interview for you.)

(15 days till Ghost Train to New Orleans!)